Entete 3

Category Archives: Others

Comorbidity and progression of late onset Alzheimer’s Disease: A systematic review

By Miriam L. Haaksma
and Lara R. Vilela, Alessandra Marengoni, Amaia Calderón-Larrañaga, Jeannie-Marie S. Leoutsakos, Marcel G.M. Olde Rikkert, René J.F. Melis.
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Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by multiple dimensions including cognitive decline, decreased daily functioning and psychiatric symptoms. This systematic review [1] aimed to investigate the relation between somatic comorbidity burden and progression in late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). We searched four databases for observational studies that examined cross-sectional or longitudinal associations of cognitive or functional or neuropsychiatric outcomes with comorbidity in individuals with LOAD. From the 7966 articles identified originally, 11 studies were included in this review. Nine studies indicated that comorbidity burden was associated with deterioration in at least one of the three dimensions of LOAD examined. Seven out of ten studies investigating cognition found comorbidities to be related to decreased cognitive performance. Five out of the seven studies investigating daily functioning showed an association between comorbidity burden and decreased daily functioning. Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) increased with increasing comorbidity burden in two out of three studies investigating NPS. Associations were predominantly found in studies analyzing the association cross-sectionally, in a time-varying manner or across short follow-up (≤2 years). Rarely baseline comorbidity burden appeared to be associated with outcomes in studies analyzing progression over longer follow-up periods (>2 years). This review provides evidence of an association between somatic comorbidities and multifaceted LOAD progression. Given that time-varying comorbidity burden, but much less so baseline comorbidity burden, was associated with the three dimensions prospectively, this relationship cannot be reduced to a simple cause-effect relation and is more likely to be dynamic. Therefore, both future studies and clinical practice may benefit from regarding comorbidity as a modifiable factor with a possibly fluctuating influence on LOAD.
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Book: Aging, Place, and Health: A Global Perspective

By: William A. Satariano, and Marlon Maus
This book represents a collaboration of experts in the field of aging and public health. The present book builds on the first edition of the book (Epidemiology of Aging:  An Ecological Approach. Satariano, 2006).
Various international researchers and practitioners were asked to join the project based on their expertise in particular areas of aging research, practice, and policy. This has resulted in a book that presents each topic, e.g., cognitive function, as an outcome in epidemiological research.  In addition, each chapter considers conceptual and measurement issues, implications for practice and policy, and future directions for research.  The book stresses a global perspective identifying work from countries throughout the world, not just the U.S.
This edition of the book is intended to target a wide audience which includes not only other experts in the field and academics, but also students, practitioners and interested researchers from other disciplines. The book is intended to help inspire further progress in the global effort towards what the World Health Organization has described as a “state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, not merely the absence of disease or infirmity” of our older population.
Chapter 8, Disease, Comorbidity, and Multimorbidity, by Martin Fortin, Aline Ramond, Cynthia Boyd, and Jose Almirall focuses on multimorbidity (MM). The authors explore how the several coexisting health conditions in a single individual negatively affect an individuals’ health-related outcomes (functional status, social participation, quality of life, life expectancy) and is also responsible for numerous impacts on society (healthcare utilization, direct and indirect costs). The importance of MM is now acknowledged as a research priority in health care, and in-depth understanding of its main determinants is required as a first step in this direction. This chapter helps distinguish MM-related essential definitions and concepts and successively addresses the role of sociodemographics, socioeconomic factors, social networks, social capital, genetics, lifestyle, psychological and psychosocial factors, and polypharmacy as potential risk factors for MM, following an ecological model of health. Finally, the chapter highlights current gaps in the literature as well as specific challenges, and suggests future directions for MM epidemiology research.

Brazilian Group of Studies about Multimorbidity

By Bruno P Nunes and Sandro R Rodrigues Batista
We are very satisfied to inform the International Research Community on Multimorbidity (an important encouraging community of our work) about the creation of the Brazilian Group of Studies about Multimorbidity (named in Portuguese: Grupo Brasileiro de Estudos sobre Multimorbidade – GBEM). The group is headed by Bruno P Nunes and Sandro R Rodrigues Batista, two researchers from Brazil. The group is already formalized in the Brazilian national research platform of the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development
Furthermore, we are described in ResearchGate too
Currently, we have more than 20 Brazilian researchers and some international collaborators, including researchers from Chile, Colombia, EUA, India, Peru, Portugal and Sri Lanka. One of our research goals as a group is to improve epidemiological information about multimorbidity in Low and Middle Income Countries, mainly in Brazil and South America. We are using a platform for planning our work and intend to publish the first scientific results of the partnership by the end of 2017. The articles already published by group members can be viewed in the ResearchGate website. Furthermore, we are looking for researchers interested in cross-country comparisons about a wide range of issues related to multimorbidity (prevalence, patterns, inequalities, use of health services and others) to be included in the GBEM. Contact e-mail for further information: nunesbp@gmail.com/ sandrorbatista@gmail.com/ gbemulti@gmail.com.

Publications on multimorbidity October – December 2016

By Martin Fortin
Our search for papers on multimorbidity that were published during the period October – December 2016 has been completed. As in previous searches, we found many new papers and the list is too long for this venue. Therefore, we have prepared a PDF file that can be accessed following this link.
Probably, there are some publications that were not detected by our search strategy using the terms “multimorbidity”, “multi-morbidity” and the expression “multiple chronic diseases” in PubMed (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed), but we are sure that most publications on the subject are included in the list.
All references are also included in our library. Feel free to share with anyone interested in multimorbidity.

Publications on multimorbidity July – September 2016

By Martin Fortin
Our search for papers on multimorbidity that were published during the period July – September 2016 has been completed. As in previous searches, we found many new papers and the list is too long for this venue. Therefore, we have prepared a PDF file that can be accessed following this link.
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Probably, there are some publications that were not detected by our search strategy using the terms “multimorbidity”, “multi-morbidity” and the expression “multiple chronic diseases”, but we are sure that most publications on the subject are included in the list.
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All references are also included in our library. Feel free to share with anyone interested in multimorbidity.

Training doctors to manage patients with multimorbidity: a systematic review

By Cliona Lewis and Susan Smith

We have published a systematic review of the literature addressing training of doctors in the management of patients with multimorbidity [1]. Overall, 75,110 citations were screened, of which 68 full-text articles were then assessed for eligibility, and just two studies met the inclusion criteria for the review.
While much has been published about the challenges presented by patients with multimorbidity, the issue of educating doctors to manage these patients has been poorly addressed. The two studies presented in this review implemented and evaluated multimorbidity workshops, and provide a basis for further research. It remains to be determined whether there is a specific need for training of doctors to manage patients with multimorbidity, and if so, how that need can best be met. It also remains to be proven that improving knowledge, skills and confidence of doctors results in improved care of this patient group. We have identified existing literature that provides a platform for management of these patients, and for curriculum development in training doctors in the management of multimorbidity. Incorporation of emerging guidelines and research findings into multimorbidity training curricula for doctors is needed in order to optimise practice and enhance the competence and confidence of doctors in managing this challenging population of patients, with the ultimate aim of improving clinical outcomes.
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1) Lewis C, Wallace E, Kyne L, Cullen W, Smith SM. Training doctors to manage patients with multimorbidity: a systematic review. Journal of Comorbidity 2016;6(2):85–94. DOI: 10.15256/joc.2016.6.87

‘Addressing the global challenge of multimorbidity’: Call for written evidence


The Academy of Medical Sciences has recently launched a new working group project on ‘Addressing the global challenge of multimorbidity’ and is seeking your views on multimorbidity as an international health challenge.

Throughout the world, as life expectancy increases, the population incidence of non-communicable diseases is also increasing. Further, communicable diseases, with both their short and long term sequelae, continue to affect millions of people every year. Together, all of these factors mean that multimorbidity has become, and will increasingly be, an international health challenge.

However, currently there is no commonly used framework for defining or more widely understanding multimorbidity. Further, most health related research is currently focused on the prevention and management of disorders in isolation. Consequently, it is difficult to compile a coherent body of research in this area or develop evidence-based strategies for use in healthcare systems. In order to address the challenge of multimorbidity, we must understand the problem better.

The questions outlined in the call for written evidence have therefore been developed to gather information on the definition(s) of multimorbidity, better understand the current knowledge base on multimorbidity as an international health challenge, and to gather opinions about future priorities and opportunities.

This call is part of our process of gathering external input into the project, and we would welcome responses from external stakeholders, including researchers, healthcare professionals, research institutions, funders, industry, patients and members of the public.

The deadline for submission is 30 November 2016.

For more information about the project and to submit a response, please visit the Academy’s website. If you have any questions, please contact Dr Rachel Brown (rachel.brown@acmedsci.ac.uk).

Publications on multimorbidity February – June 2016

By Martin Fortin
Our search for papers on multimorbidity that were published during the period February – June 2016 has been completed. As in previous searches, we found many new papers and the list is too long for this venue. Therefore, we have prepared a PDF file that can be accessed following this link.
Probably, there are some publications that were not detected by our search strategy using the terms “multimorbidity”, “multi-morbidity” and the expression “multiple chronic diseases”, but we are sure that most publications on the subject are included in the list.
All references are also included in our library. Feel free to share with anyone interested in multimorbidity.

Updated Cochrane Review: Interventions for improving outcomes in patients with multimorbidity in primary care and community settings


By Susan M Smith, Emma Wallace, Tom O’Dowd, Martin Fortin
This Cochrane systematic review aimed to identify and summarise the existing evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to improve clinical and mental health outcomes and patient-reported outcomes including health-related quality of life for people with multimorbidity in primary care and community settings.
The Cochrane library have just published an update of the original 2012 review and for this update the literature was searched up to September 2015. In total, we identified 18 generally well-designed randomised controlled trials meeting the eligibility criteria, 8 of which were identified in the updated searches. Nine of the 18 studies focused on specific combinations of health conditions (comorbidity studies), for example diabetes and heart disease. The other nine studies included people with a broad range of conditions (multimorbidity studies) although they tended to focus on elderly people. The majority of studies examined interventions that involved changes to the organisation of care delivery although some studies had more patient-focused interventions.
Key results
Overall the results regarding the effectiveness of interventions were mixed. There were no clear positive improvements in clinical outcomes, health service use, medication adherence, patient-related health behaviours, health professional behaviours or costs. There were modest improvements in mental health outcomes from seven studies that targeted people with depression, and in functional outcomes from two studies targeting functional difficulties in participants. Overall the results indicate that it is difficult to improve outcomes for people with multiple conditions. The review suggests that interventions that are designed to target specific risk factors (for example treatment for depression) or interventions that focus on difficulties that people experience with daily functioning (for example, physiotherapy treatment to improve capacity for physical activity) may be more effective.
Authors’ conclusions:
This review identifies the emerging evidence to support policy for the management of people with multimorbidity and common comorbidities in primary care and community settings. There are remaining uncertainties about the effectiveness of interventions for people with multimorbidity in general due to the relatively small number of RCTs conducted in this area to date, with mixed findings overall. However, several large ongoing studies were identified that will add to the slowly emerging evidence base. The current evidence from this review suggest an improvement in health outcomes if interventions can be targeted at risk factors such as depression, or specific functional difficulties in people with multimorbidity.
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Citation: Smith SM, Wallace E, O’Dowd T, Fortin M. Interventions for improving outcomes in patients with multimorbidity in primary care and community settings. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2016, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD006560. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006560.pub3.

Publications on multimorbidity September 2015 – January 2016


By Martin Fortin
Our search for papers on multimorbidity that were published during the period September 2015 – January 2016 has been completed. As in previous searches, we found many new papers and the list is too long for this venue. Therefore, we have prepared a PDF file that can be accessed following this link.
Probably, there are some publications that were not detected by our search strategy using the terms “multimorbidity”, “multi-morbidity” and the expression “multiple chronic diseases”, but we are sure that most publications on the subject are included in the list.
All references are also included in our library. Feel free to share with anyone interested in multimorbidity.